3 Ways to Install Your New Deck

Posted July 3rd, 2013 by Decking Materials

When it comes time to install your deck, there are several methods. It’s a good idea to decide exactly what method you’ll use before buying the material, since different techniques have different requirements.

To help you decide which installation method is right for your project, here’s a quick rundown:

Face Screw Method

This is what most people think of at first. It definitely has some merit, being both the fastest and cheapest method available. Standard boards are simply screwed straight down onto the joists. Pretty straightforward. There are a few downsides, however. For one, the finished deck will show the screw heads, which can tarnish the look you’re going for. Also, this method doesn’t allow for the natural expansion and contraction of the wood boards. As moisture and temperature levels change, the screws will be pulled back and forth, loosening and popping out.

If you choose to go with the face screw method, here are the materials you’ll need:

  • Standard (S4S E4E) Deck Boards
  • Stainless Steel Screws

Plug Method

The next method is a natural extension of the face screw technique. The key difference is that the screws are countersunk into the board, and a matching piece of wood is used to plug the hole and hide the screw head. The main improvement is in appearance. The main drawback is the increased effort required to glue the plugs in place and sand them down to create a level surface.

If you choose to go with the plug method, here are the materials you’ll need:

  • Standard (S4S E4E) Deck Boards
  • Stainless Steel Screws
  • Wood Plugs

Hidden Fastener Method

This last method is the most recommended. When it comes to appearance and long-term deck performance, it is easily the best, but there are also a few drawbacks that you should be aware of. First, unless you buy pregrooved deck boards, this method will be very labor-intensive, since you’ll have to manually cut grooves in the sides of the boards. Second, replacing damaged boards can be a serious hassle.

The key upside is no screws will be visible in the finished deck. Also, the unique fastening system allows for expansion and contraction, which means less cupping and no screw popup.

If you choose to go with the hidden fastener method, here are the materials you’ll need:

  • Pregrooved Deck Boards
  • Stainless Steel Screws
  • Hidden Deck Fasteners
  • Wood Plugs (for end boards)

Conclusion

So there you have it. ?Weigh the pros and cons of each installation method against your unique project and skill set, then get started building your new deck!

Is Bamboo Decking a Viable Option?

Posted June 24th, 2013 by ipemadeira

Although not terribly common, bamboo has emerged as an alternative to traditional wood decking. You may already be familiar with bamboo as a flooring option, and the process for turning it into a decking material is similar. In essence, thin bamboo planks are glued together to form a board.

Bamboo flooring has received mixed reviews, with some homeowners experiencing serious problems. That’s something you should be aware of when considering bamboo decking, because any issues encountered indoors will only be amplified when the material is used outdoors.

For example: moisture. Most complaints about bamboo flooring stem from moisture issues. You can imagine how that would be an even bigger problem for a deck exposed to rain. The glue that holds the boards together can fail, causing the bamboo to, in the words of one contractor, “fall apart like shredded wheat”.

So how would yo prevent this from happening? Diligent maintenance, and lots of it. Perhaps there’s a reason bamboo decking isn’t very common.

Are Decking Tiles Right for You?

Posted June 19th, 2013 by ipemadeira

When considering a new deck, most people think immediately and exclusively of traditional deck boards. Another option you might not have considered is decking tiles. These modular squares can be the perfect fit depending on your situation.

Pre-built tiles come in a variety of sizes ranging from 12×12 to 24×24. Some companies even sell rectangular tiles. These options can be arranged in an infinite array of patterns. You can criss-crossed, weave-like patterns, or align all the tiles the same way. The only limitation is that you’re stuck with a grid-like layout. If you don’t like that, then deck tiles aren’t for you.

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Because of their modularity, tiles are probably the easiest decking solution to install. You don’t need a frame–just a hard flat surface. You don’t even need to hire a contractor. Most tiles will interlock with each other or come with special connectors, so installing them doesn’t require any special skills. Even the kids can lend a hand, and the whole project can be finished in a couple hours.

Decking tiles are perfect if you move around a lot. Their easy installation also makes for easy uninstallation. If you move, you can take your deck with you. Or maybe your change isn’t quite so drastic; you just got tired of design you chose. Simply lift up the tiles and rearrange them.

One downside is that tiles can be more expensive than traditional deck boards. A 24×24 ipe tile costs $40. To cover the same amount of space with traditional ipe boards would cost about $28.

Deck tiles come in many different materials. As usual, I would recommend steering away from plastic or composites, and favor hardwoods instead.

Tigerwood Why it’s The Best Decking Choice

Posted May 6th, 2010 by ipemadeira

Tigerwood also known as Goncalo Alves, Muiracatiara and Brazilian Koa, is rapidly becoming a popular deck choice for many homeowners and contractors. This wood decking species is found mainly in South America and offers a beautiful and totally look. With a remarkable array of rusty orange, amber, and reddish brown hues and dark streaks a deck made of Tigerwood is a real sight to see. Designers and high end consumers rave over the distinguished look and unique coloring and streaks that lend an exotic and striking feel to what might otherwise be the same old look. When you add the many wonderful properties that come with this exotic wood and you have the perfect combination.

Tigerwood lumber has been used for many years domestically in the countries it is found in. It is a recent discovery for the US market that has many contractors and builders excited. With a Janka Hardness rating of 1850, it is over 4 times stronger than California Redwood. This exotic wood is sustainably harvested and available in FSC certified and non FSC certified timber. While all FSC certified wood is more expensive, you can rest assured that with the Lacey Act in place, you are guaranteed a responsibly harvested deck that supports the local environment and assures positive forest practices. There are also custom rails and posts available in this hardwood for a unique and custom application. The finished look of this deck material is surprisingly tropical in feel and creates the atmosphere of your own private oasis.

Tigerwood has many benefits that make it great for outdoor garden decking. It is naturally slip resistant and, thanks to its high density, repels insects. These factors are huge because no pesticides or chemicals have to be added. You also can have peace of mind and no concerns about chemical exposure to your children or family members. Tigerwood decking is also naturally mold and fungus resistant so you don’t have to worry when the black spots will appear as plastic decking. The longevity of this wood is well over 25 years without preservatives and can be extended with deck oil finishes. This lifespan exceeds the time that most people will ever stay in their home. It also means that you won’t have to remove and replace your deck in 5-7 years. When you compare the cost of ipe and composite to Tigerwood you will find that it is also one of the least expensive tropical wood decking species for your money.

For you contractors and deck builders out there, this material doesn’t require pre-drilling and is very easy to work with. If you have installed other hardwoods, then you know what I am talking about. You won’t get a call back about the deck peeling like you can with composite decks and you don’t have to worry about environmental concerns as this wood is completely biodegradable. You will have customers that refer you to their friends and family and praise your name because they have a beautiful project no matter what size. Ultimately, when you offer genuine material that will not cause you a headache later and is priced well below other similar deck boards, you can proceed to your deck building project with confidence. With these facts in mind, you can see that Tigerwood decking really is the perfect choice for your home or commercial project.

 

Wood Decking- What Composite & PVC Companies Don’t Want You to Know

Posted March 16th, 2010 by ipemadeira

The decking industry has grown exponentially over the last two decades. There are many companies that have come and gone over that time. Many people are familiar with the terms composite decking and PVC decking. The idea of such a product has merit. No maintenance, durable, consistent, warranted and several colors to choose from, sounds too good to be true. The green movement has prompted many people to look for an eco-friendly deck to help the environment. What’s not to like? Let’s take a look at the facts.

Composite decking is made of wood particles mainly sawdust and resin (some recycled). The idea is simple enough but what happens when you take plastic (which by the way comes from petroleum) and mix it with saw dust? The lawsuits and complaints found all say the same things. Warping, discoloration, de-lamination, injuries, molding, fungus, blistering, rotting and splintering are just a few of the problems that have been reported. Warranties have not been honored, businesses have gone bankrupt trying to resolve issues and lawsuits and customers have been left to figure it out on their own. What I don’t get is how any company that makes composite decking can state it is a green product. The resin even when recycled is made of plastic, a petroleum product and one of the two top carbon emitting products produced. Recycled resin has been tested and is not as resilient and durable as the original plastic composition. The lifetime of the deck must be considered and also where does the deck go at the end of its lifetime?

Polyvinyl chloride commonly referred to as PVC is a manufactured plastic with toxic byproducts. Dioxin (potent carcinogen), ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride are made in the production of PVC and causes health problems. Some of the problems are neurological damage, birth defects, impaired child development, endocrine disruption, endometriosis, immune system damage, reproductive damage and cancer. This is the material used in PVC decking. In 1998 there were attempts to recycle this product that were considered a failure by the Association of Post Consumer Plastics Recyclers. The dioxin in PVC is a persistent toxin that does not break down rapidly and migrates in the air via wind and in the water transporting itself in the fatty tissues of sea life. It has been discovered in dangerous concentrations in the tissues of whales, polar bears, fish and Inuit mother’s breast milk. The lethal additives such as lead, cadmium and organotins used in PVC used to keep it from breaking down is known to cause cancer, lead poisoning and asthma. Does this sound like the type of product you want your children, pets, environment and yourself exposed to?

Now let’s take a look at natural wood decking. Yes the original materials used to make homes and structures from the beginning of time. A hardwood such as ipe will have a lifetime of 40 years without any treatment and over 100 years with one application of UV inhibitor. Ipe is a tropical wood that has grown in popularity for its beauty, density, resistance to mold and insects and longevity. This hardwood is used in commercial projects such as the Miami Beach Boardwalk for good reason. The Lacey Act, GFTN (Global Forest & Trade Network), IBAMA and other organizations have helped to keep illegal logs from coming into the country. You can now get FSC certified decking for LEED projects or for your own peace of mind. Rest assured this product will break completely down without harming the environment, is completely recyclable and sustainable. What we have been looking for has been around all along. What’s not to like?

Shiplap Siding with Ipe Tropical Lumber

Posted February 22nd, 2010 by ipemadeira

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Shiplap siding has been used for many years as a protection and a decorative addition to the exterior and interior of buildings and homes. Wood siding comes in many types and installing it can be labor intensive so for this reason you want to pick a hardwood with longevity and durability. This will give you ease of mind as you won?t have to replace in 5-10 years and will increase the value of your home besides the obvious aesthetic beauty that is present in a natural wood product.

Ipe is growing in demand as a beautiful and dense hardwood for decks and siding. This tropical lumber has a Janka Hardness rating of 3680 and has 8 times the strength of the California Redwood. Not only does Ipe have a natural resistance to insects, mold and fungus but is also fire rated the same as steel and concrete. How is that for reassurance? Ipe wood has beautiful warm reds and browns with natural variations that allow for a unique and rich statement. This species of wood has a lifespan of over 40 years with no treatments and over 100 years with one application of UV protection. This alone has a price savings over other species that have to be changed in as little as 7-10 years.

When considering the materials you will use for your next project, remember to compare the many variables as well as the lifetime of the product. No one likes to have to replace something they installed 7 years previously. Other factors should be if and how the wood has been treated and if it can stand up to the extreme weather changes that can come our way. Ipe shiplap siding has been used in commercial applications such as the Eco-Park in Houston Texas and in residential applications as well. Many builders and contractors are familiar with this tropical lumber and have used it as a decking material and or siding and can tell you why it is the preferred material by the most discriminating people.

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Hardwood Timber for Decks, Patios & Porches

Posted February 5th, 2010 by ipemadeira
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Why is timber the choice for many people when they consider decks, patios and porches? Timber has been a much needed resource for our ancestors for thousands of years. Trees provided wood to make fire for heat making winters bearable and for foods that would otherwise be hard to eat. Timber also was used for building homes. This natural resource is biodegradable, recyclable, energy efficient, durable, salvageable and beautiful. Timber uses less energy to process than steel, concrete, plastic and aluminum.

What timber is most recommended for durability and longevity? The tropical hardwood Ipe from South America is known for its? strength, durability, beauty and resistance to insects, rot and mold/fungus. This hardwood has a Janka rating of over 3600. Ipe wood is 8 x?s harder than the California redwood with a fire rating class A same as concrete and steel and slip resistance rated above the coefficient of friction for commercial applications. The hardwood is so dense it is resistant to mold and fungus. No worries about chemicals, Ipe is also insect and rot resistant. Ipe has been used in several commercial applications due to its strength and natural beauty.

Ipe has a life expectancy of 40 plus years with no maintenance and is highly recommended for marinas, docks and piers. Slip resistant and dense, this hardwood is used in commercial applications such as the Boardwalk in Miami and numerous hotels and restaurants for good reason. This timber has just recently become popular as previously it was hard to cut and get to. Now with new technology and better transportation methods it has become economically available and with new government regulations and private organizations such as FSC, it is being responsibly harvested. This makes a big difference especially just in the last 10 years.

When you take in to consideration the longevity, aesthetics, durability and strength of the various deck boards on the market, you will agree that Ipe has the best qualities for the money. You get a long lasting, low maintenance, absolutely stunning and environmentally friendly deck. FSC certified deck boards are now available and with the Lacey Act in affect you can rest assured that the Ipe being supplied to the US is coming from responsibly harvested forests. Timber is and has always been the material of choice for decks, patios and porches for many reasons. The natural beauty of timber and the feel of wood under your feet are just two reasons for the popularity. You can have your cake and eat it too with an Ipe hardwood deck.

Deck Boards What to Look For

Posted February 2nd, 2010 by ipemadeira
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Most of us at some point in our lives will invest in a deck or outdoor area. There are so many different types of deck boards available that it can become overwhelming. This is an important part of the?purchasing ?process for several reasons. The boards you select will determine how long the deck will last, whether you will have to treat the deck for insects, mold or fungus, if it will need to be built away from direct sun exposure, the aesthetics and strength of the deck. Let?s examine the different materials and what to look for.

The most common deck board is the pressure treated wood boards. This is also the least expensive but the lifespan for this material is only 5-10 years depending upon the environment. Pressure treated lumber also emit some nasty outgases of chemicals to living creatures and its surroundings. The likelihood of replacement in 10 years is high so in the long run the cost factor does go up as labor and materials will have to be replaced, creating more work and materials at a future date.

A growing industry is the composite decking and PVC decking industry. The composite decking industry is a fairly new industry and is a mix of plastic and wood dust or wood particles and a type of glue. The problem with this is the durability and strength deteriorates over time and is not great to begin with. That is the reason the joists can not be made of composite. The increase in lawsuits and bankruptcy of different composite companies is a telltale sign of problems to come. PVC decking has similar problems coupled with the fact that it is made from PVC. Polyvinyl chloride commonly referred to as PVC is a manufactured plastic with toxic byproducts. Dioxin (potent carcinogen), ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride are made in the production of PVC and causes health problems. Neurological damage, birth defects, impaired child development, endocrine disruption, endometriosis, immune system damage, reproductive damage and cancer are some of those problems. There is a lot of good information out there on the hazards to you and your environment.

Tropical wood decking is also a growing industry and one that is sustainable. This industry has gotten a lot of bad rap in the last few years for forest destruction but in reality can be an asset to forests as it creates a demand for trees. If you research the actual cause of forest depletion than you will find that cattle grazing and agricultural cash cropping are 90% of the cause. These uses destroy the soil for future tree growth where trees being logged can be replaced and if managed properly can help surrounding trees to grow faster with access to sunlight and room for growth. This recent stir of accountability has increased associations such as FSC, Green Peace and Smartwood to form and grow as well as government agencies to take a stance such as IBAMA in Brazil and our own govt. to utilize processes such as the Lacey Act regulating where the lumber comes from and verifying it is from a managed forest not illegally harvested. Now if you look at species such as Ipe, Cumaru, Tigerwood and Garapa than you will realize you can have the best of both worlds. These species are absolutely beautiful and the density of these deck boards is very high. They are naturally repellant to insects, mold, fungus and rot. No insect repellant sprays are needed and no replacements in your lifetime. This is a no brainer and the alternatives we create are not better nor are they as eco-friendly as supporting your well managed forests.

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