Tigerwood Why it’s The Best Decking Choice

Posted May 6th, 2010 by ipemadeira

Tigerwood also known as Goncalo Alves, Muiracatiara and Brazilian Koa, is rapidly becoming a popular deck choice for many homeowners and contractors. This wood decking species is found mainly in South America and offers a beautiful and totally look. With a remarkable array of rusty orange, amber, and reddish brown hues and dark streaks a deck made of Tigerwood is a real sight to see. Designers and high end consumers rave over the distinguished look and unique coloring and streaks that lend an exotic and striking feel to what might otherwise be the same old look. When you add the many wonderful properties that come with this exotic wood and you have the perfect combination.

Tigerwood lumber has been used for many years domestically in the countries it is found in. It is a recent discovery for the US market that has many contractors and builders excited. With a Janka Hardness rating of 1850, it is over 4 times stronger than California Redwood. This exotic wood is sustainably harvested and available in FSC certified and non FSC certified timber. While all FSC certified wood is more expensive, you can rest assured that with the Lacey Act in place, you are guaranteed a responsibly harvested deck that supports the local environment and assures positive forest practices. There are also custom rails and posts available in this hardwood for a unique and custom application. The finished look of this deck material is surprisingly tropical in feel and creates the atmosphere of your own private oasis.

Tigerwood has many benefits that make it great for outdoor garden decking. It is naturally slip resistant and, thanks to its high density, repels insects. These factors are huge because no pesticides or chemicals have to be added. You also can have peace of mind and no concerns about chemical exposure to your children or family members. Tigerwood decking is also naturally mold and fungus resistant so you don’t have to worry when the black spots will appear as plastic decking. The longevity of this wood is well over 25 years without preservatives and can be extended with deck oil finishes. This lifespan exceeds the time that most people will ever stay in their home. It also means that you won’t have to remove and replace your deck in 5-7 years. When you compare the cost of ipe and composite to Tigerwood you will find that it is also one of the least expensive tropical wood decking species for your money.

For you contractors and deck builders out there, this material doesn’t require pre-drilling and is very easy to work with. If you have installed other hardwoods, then you know what I am talking about. You won’t get a call back about the deck peeling like you can with composite decks and you don’t have to worry about environmental concerns as this wood is completely biodegradable. You will have customers that refer you to their friends and family and praise your name because they have a beautiful project no matter what size. Ultimately, when you offer genuine material that will not cause you a headache later and is priced well below other similar deck boards, you can proceed to your deck building project with confidence. With these facts in mind, you can see that Tigerwood decking really is the perfect choice for your home or commercial project.

 

Wood Decking- What Composite & PVC Companies Don’t Want You to Know

Posted March 16th, 2010 by ipemadeira

The decking industry has grown exponentially over the last two decades. There are many companies that have come and gone over that time. Many people are familiar with the terms composite decking and PVC decking. The idea of such a product has merit. No maintenance, durable, consistent, warranted and several colors to choose from, sounds too good to be true. The green movement has prompted many people to look for an eco-friendly deck to help the environment. What’s not to like? Let’s take a look at the facts.

Composite decking is made of wood particles mainly sawdust and resin (some recycled). The idea is simple enough but what happens when you take plastic (which by the way comes from petroleum) and mix it with saw dust? The lawsuits and complaints found all say the same things. Warping, discoloration, de-lamination, injuries, molding, fungus, blistering, rotting and splintering are just a few of the problems that have been reported. Warranties have not been honored, businesses have gone bankrupt trying to resolve issues and lawsuits and customers have been left to figure it out on their own. What I don’t get is how any company that makes composite decking can state it is a green product. The resin even when recycled is made of plastic, a petroleum product and one of the two top carbon emitting products produced. Recycled resin has been tested and is not as resilient and durable as the original plastic composition. The lifetime of the deck must be considered and also where does the deck go at the end of its lifetime?

Polyvinyl chloride commonly referred to as PVC is a manufactured plastic with toxic byproducts. Dioxin (potent carcinogen), ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride are made in the production of PVC and causes health problems. Some of the problems are neurological damage, birth defects, impaired child development, endocrine disruption, endometriosis, immune system damage, reproductive damage and cancer. This is the material used in PVC decking. In 1998 there were attempts to recycle this product that were considered a failure by the Association of Post Consumer Plastics Recyclers. The dioxin in PVC is a persistent toxin that does not break down rapidly and migrates in the air via wind and in the water transporting itself in the fatty tissues of sea life. It has been discovered in dangerous concentrations in the tissues of whales, polar bears, fish and Inuit mother’s breast milk. The lethal additives such as lead, cadmium and organotins used in PVC used to keep it from breaking down is known to cause cancer, lead poisoning and asthma. Does this sound like the type of product you want your children, pets, environment and yourself exposed to?

Now let’s take a look at natural wood decking. Yes the original materials used to make homes and structures from the beginning of time. A hardwood such as ipe will have a lifetime of 40 years without any treatment and over 100 years with one application of UV inhibitor. Ipe is a tropical wood that has grown in popularity for its beauty, density, resistance to mold and insects and longevity. This hardwood is used in commercial projects such as the Miami Beach Boardwalk for good reason. The Lacey Act, GFTN (Global Forest & Trade Network), IBAMA and other organizations have helped to keep illegal logs from coming into the country. You can now get FSC certified decking for LEED projects or for your own peace of mind. Rest assured this product will break completely down without harming the environment, is completely recyclable and sustainable. What we have been looking for has been around all along. What’s not to like?

Deck Boards What to Look For

Posted February 2nd, 2010 by ipemadeira
 

 

 

Most of us at some point in our lives will invest in a deck or outdoor area. There are so many different types of deck boards available that it can become overwhelming. This is an important part of the purchasing  process for several reasons. The boards you select will determine how long the deck will last, whether you will have to treat the deck for insects, mold or fungus, if it will need to be built away from direct sun exposure, the aesthetics and strength of the deck. Let’s examine the different materials and what to look for.

The most common deck board is the pressure treated wood boards. This is also the least expensive but the lifespan for this material is only 5-10 years depending upon the environment. Pressure treated lumber also emit some nasty outgases of chemicals to living creatures and its surroundings. The likelihood of replacement in 10 years is high so in the long run the cost factor does go up as labor and materials will have to be replaced, creating more work and materials at a future date.

A growing industry is the composite decking and PVC decking industry. The composite decking industry is a fairly new industry and is a mix of plastic and wood dust or wood particles and a type of glue. The problem with this is the durability and strength deteriorates over time and is not great to begin with. That is the reason the joists can not be made of composite. The increase in lawsuits and bankruptcy of different composite companies is a telltale sign of problems to come. PVC decking has similar problems coupled with the fact that it is made from PVC. Polyvinyl chloride commonly referred to as PVC is a manufactured plastic with toxic byproducts. Dioxin (potent carcinogen), ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride are made in the production of PVC and causes health problems. Neurological damage, birth defects, impaired child development, endocrine disruption, endometriosis, immune system damage, reproductive damage and cancer are some of those problems. There is a lot of good information out there on the hazards to you and your environment.

Tropical wood decking is also a growing industry and one that is sustainable. This industry has gotten a lot of bad rap in the last few years for forest destruction but in reality can be an asset to forests as it creates a demand for trees. If you research the actual cause of forest depletion than you will find that cattle grazing and agricultural cash cropping are 90% of the cause. These uses destroy the soil for future tree growth where trees being logged can be replaced and if managed properly can help surrounding trees to grow faster with access to sunlight and room for growth. This recent stir of accountability has increased associations such as FSC, Green Peace and Smartwood to form and grow as well as government agencies to take a stance such as IBAMA in Brazil and our own govt. to utilize processes such as the Lacey Act regulating where the lumber comes from and verifying it is from a managed forest not illegally harvested. Now if you look at species such as Ipe, Cumaru, Tigerwood and Garapa than you will realize you can have the best of both worlds. These species are absolutely beautiful and the density of these deck boards is very high. They are naturally repellant to insects, mold, fungus and rot. No insect repellant sprays are needed and no replacements in your lifetime. This is a no brainer and the alternatives we create are not better nor are they as eco-friendly as supporting your well managed forests.

 

 

 

PVC Decking- Poisonous Volatile Compounds

Posted October 5th, 2009 by ipemadeira

 

PVC decking has been growing in popularity as companies are heavily marketing the perks but is it worth the gamble? Polyvinyl chloride commonly referred to as PVC is a manufactured plastic with toxic byproducts. Dioxin (potent carcinogen), ethylene dichloride and vinyl chloride are made in the production of PVC and causes health problems. Neurological damage, birth defects, impaired child development, endocrine disruption, endometriosis, immune system damage, reproductive damage and cancer are some of those problems.

PVC was labeled a contaminant in 1998 and efforts to recycle it were declared a failure by the Association of Post Consumer Plastics Recyclers. Did you know that PVC when exposed to fires release toxins long after it ignites and in landfills may be the largest source of dioxin releases in this environment. The dioxin is a persistent toxin that does not break down rapidly and migrates in the air via wind and in the water transporting itself in the fatty tissues of sea life. It has been discovered in dangerous concentrations in the tissues of whales, polar bears,fish and Inuit mother’s breast milk. The lethal additives such as lead, cadmium and organotins used in PVC used to keep it from breaking down is known to cause cancer, lead poisoning and asthma.

At what cost are we willing to compromise our lifestyle? Are we willing to expose our children and friends to this material because we want supposedly less maintenance? All decking will require maintenance at some point and compromising your future well being and that of your planet is just not worth it. This material has long lasting damaging effects on human as well as other species not to mention the environment. We scream and yell about the dangers of mold and fungus in our drywalls and about the effects of pollutants in our waters but how about how PVC is taking over the construction of our homes.

Construction materials are 75% of what PVC is produced for, ranging from electrical wire insulation to shades and blinds to vinyl flooring to gutters. The true cost of this product has not been publicized until now. Fortunately, there is a wide range of alternatives that are cost effective and without the toxic effects of PVC.

Decking is made to be enjoyed and add value to your home. Please do not expose your family and outside environment to this toxic alternative. If you are looking for a low maintenance, chemical free and long lasting deck with a fire rating same as concrete than you have found it in Ipe.

Ipe decking has long been used in commercial and residential applications for a beautiful natural and durable deck. FSC certified Ipe is also available for the most discriminating client or LEED points projects and guarantees responsible forest practices. No other product can stand up to Ipe’s strength (janka rating 3680), insect & mold/fungus resistance (no chemicals) and this product is totally renewable, recyclable and bio-degradable! If you are looking for low maintenance, than you have found your answer in this product.